The Science Behind Podcast Advertising

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In the past few years statistic after statistic has been released about podcast advertising’s high engagement rate and tailored niche audiences. But what is it exactly that makes them so effective? The answer lies in science. 

The Podcast Voice Inside your Head

“If you spend even a short amount of time listening to the radio, an audiobook, or a podcast, you begin to make a connection to the voice you’re hearing. After you spend hours listening to that same voice on a daily or weekly basis, it feels just like you’re listening to a friend.” 

Glenn Rubenstein, Author of Podcast Advertising Works

Rubenstein calls this phenomenon the voice inside your head. As any marketer will tell you, some of the most effective forms of marketing comes word from your trusted resourced like friends or family. In the case of listening to a podcast consistently it creates a similar feeling or response as someone you are close to. 

Midroll conducted a recent study that found 72% of people who have listened to a podcast for four or more years have made a purchase because of that podcast. To put that into perspective, 92% of online ads are not even noticed. Furthermore the Midroll study also noted that 63% of podcast listeners surveyed at one point in time purchased a product that they heard about from a podcast. 

Actively Listening to Podcasts

There are different ways in which we can consume information from watching TV, calling a friend on the phone, reading and of course listening. 

 “…like reading, listening to audio allows people to create their own versions of characters and scenes in the story.”

Emma Rodero, Communications Professor at Pompeu Fabra University Barcelona

Rodero also concludes that listening has to be more active because your brain is forced to consume it at the rate at which it is happening or in the case of a podcast being played.

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